Saturday, 1 October 2011

5 Food Myths Dispelled

Myth:
Coke makes kids go hyper. 

Fact:
Contrary to every mother's belief, Coca-Cola does not make children hyperactive. It's the belief itself that makes someone perceive this. If you think it's going to happen, you'll (subconsciously) notice signs that support this idea, regardless. In the same way you might notice a lot of faults in someone you didn't like anyway, regardless of whether they might actual be nice. A similar thing will happen to the child, as a type of placebo effect. Trying convincing a mother of this though...








Courtesy of FreeDigitalPhotos.net by Paul
Myth:
Croissants aren't French

Fact: 
There is a lot of disagreement about the origins of croissants. Was it Vienna? Budapest? Austria? No. There are no contemporary sources to suggest any of these places. While there are many stories and legends floating around, what we consider as a croissant today, using puff pastry, is French. The word "croissant" first appeared in a dictionary in 1850 and first recipe published in 1891.





Myth:
Haggis is Scottish.

Fact:
There is little historical evidence to support the popular notion that the origins of haggis is Scottish. In fact, it first appeared in a Lancastrian the cookbook Liber Cure Cocorum. Variations of haggis can be found in Roman and Ancient Greek cultures, but it's unclear as to whether either of these are direct ancestors of the haggis we know today.


Myth:
Fast food is bad for you.

Fact:
Well, yes, it is. Having one Big Mac won't kill you, but living on a diet solely of burgers and fries most probably will. Much in the same way living on a diet wholly comprised of homemade shepherd's pie can't be good for you either. Everything in moderation.



Myth:
E-numbers are bad for you and artificial.

Fact:
Vitamin C's E-number is E300, vitamin C clearly isn't bad for you. Every ingredient that is used as an additive has a code assigned to it. As for being totally artificial, E122 is a crimson colouring made from cochineal. Cochineal is an insect. Even products that claim to be "E-number free" contain ingredients that have them, it simple means that the pure forms are not added as extra.


Do you have any other myths you'd like to add?

5 comments:

  1. Interesting post. It would be the sugar in the cola that would make the kids hyper. I'm all for the moderation theory. No food is bad.

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  2. There are fruit juices with higher sugar content, and they don't have this effect. Though I'm sure they're different types if that'd make a difference. However, the sugar content in cola would still not make them any more hyperactive than a chocolate bar would.

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  3. Caffeine is obviously a stimulant and, to be honest, I hadn't considered that when I did my research. However, I've just found out that a cup of tea contains 3 times as much caffeine as cola. My niece has drank tea on numerous occasions and never had any problems.
    So, if it does have an effect on the child, it will be amplified by the supposition that they are going to be hyperactive.

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  4. Interesting ideas. I totally agree with everything in moderation, and also everyone reacts differently, based on their own unique body chemistry.

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